support Ukrainian language (3)



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obw
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2004 20:08 - Edited by: obw
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versu

Of course, the resident language expert. ;)

Locative: RuslanI
I find the locative concept somehow fascinating. "Where are you?" "At Ruslana. We're rocking and recording a new song."

BTW, in the Ruhr area (where I live) there is a german vocative, it is constructed by prefixing the name with "ey, ". Example: "Ey, Horst!" To express urgency, also suffix: "Ey, Horst, ey!"
(This is a joke and should not be taken seriously, but germans can laugh about it. Well, some of them.)

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 15 Nov 2004 20:13
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OoOoh, my......... this is VERY complicated for a Lussekatt. When it comes to diffifult reading for me I tend to see it all blurred but I emediately saw this:

who do you call? Ghostbusters!

Sorry, sometimes its impossible to deal with me but this is archieved in the forum now and I can always go back to it....

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 26 Nov 2004 17:36 - Edited by: Vorheart
Reply 


I wanted to learn the texts for Ruslana's songs and then I recently saw a nice link posted somewhere in the forums:
[url=] http://www.ukma.kiev.ua/pub/courses/UFL/ [/url]

It's a link to free online course in Ukranian language for beginners. I find it very useful and the basics are explained in an easy way (they also have audio examples :)
I am proud to say that I've begun to learn the language and I certainly hope to visit Ukraine soon.

Croatia was still a part of Yugoslavia when I was in elementary school and so I learned Cyrillics while I was in third grade. They don't teach them anymore but I still remember the letters and how to read them, so that's one problem out of the way :D

Croatian language (being also a slavic language) is not that different from Ukranian, and my mother taught me a good deal about Polish (she's from Bogatynia) so that helps a lot too... :)

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 14:01 - Edited by: Vorheart
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Hey, does anyone have a link to a really good online dictionary?
Either Ukrainian-English or Ukrainian-German will do...

Reason being - I've started to browse through the Ukranian language topics and online newspapers (the best way to learn a language).
I already know the more common words, and all online dictionaries I've found so far contain only a very limited amount of words (mostly not much more than I already know). Almost half the words I entered didn't translate well or didn't translate at all.


Now I'm seriosuly considering buying a real dictionary, but it's always nice to know where you can find a good online version...

Thanks!

versu
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 14:36
Reply 


Vorheart

I only know of two

www.slovnyk.org (very slow but 5 languages supported)

and

http://lingresua.tripod.com/online/ (better but Ukr-Eng-Ukr only)

obw
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 16:02
Reply 


versu
http://lingresua.tripod.com/online/ (better but Ukr-Eng-Ukr only)

I found it's mirror at
http://www.cybermova.com/cgi-bin/oluaen.pl

faster and more reliable.

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 16:28
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I used the one at cybermova.com before; it has some words, but not a lot of them. For instance, instead of the sound a cuckoo makes when signing, it kept offering 'to forge', lol. Or did I misundertand the meaning of ? Neither of the two translators seems able to to translate it :/
Same for ... that's 'face', right?

However, I'm still not clear on the meaning of , again neither translator has it... I'll really have to buy a normal dictionary. :)

Thanks for the slovnyk.org, it's slow and still misses a few words but two translators are always better than one :)

versu
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 16:47 - Edited by: versu
Reply 


Vorheart
For instance, instead of the sound a cuckoo makes when signing, it kept offering 'to forge', lol.

Unfortunately, that is correct. The two words are identical in Ukrainian.
Kuvaty = to make the sound of a cuckoo and to forge or hammer (in a smithy)

Same for ... that's 'face', right?

Leheni are lungs, but I'm not sure if it is related. It may be dialectal. Oblychchia is a face

If you cannot find a decent dictionary in Croatia, try asking relatives in Poland or either

www.knyha.com or www.yevshan.com

Blukaty means to wander.

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 16:49
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Thanks for explaining! :)

obw
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 16:59
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Vorheart


I just tried a new found resource, a pure ukrainian dictionary (similar to Webster's or ALOxford's for english, but no explanations here, just a grammatical overview), but the word is not even there.
http://ulif.org.ua/ulp/dict_all/index.php

But as I just see, I have not looked in the three other categories... =:-) I only browsed inflections, not synonyms or phrases...

I think it is a belittlement(?), so the stem word is different anyway.

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 27 Nov 2004 18:58
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I think so too... probably from or (that's how the root would look according to our grammar), or maybe it's more irregular.

SKILER
Member
# Posted: 28 Nov 2004 01:00
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Hey EVERYONE!!!


If you want to learn it it is easy.

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 28 Nov 2004 10:22
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Well, I sure hope so! Kids can learn it so it can't be too difficult! ;D

Seriously now, I can already read cyrillics (albeit not as fast as latin letters yet), and my vocabular is slowly expanding. I've learned several new words yesterday and I've definitely decided to buy a dictionary. I've managed to read the whole article about the the situation in parlament yesterday :)

Heart_healer
Member
# Posted: 28 Nov 2004 14:06 - Edited by: Heart_healer
Reply 


Vorheart
instead of the sound a cuckoo makes when signing, it kept offering 'to forge', lol. Or did I misundertand the meaning of ? Neither of the two translators seems able to to translate it :/
Same for ... that's 'face', right?


as for cuckoo's singing, ** is a correct translation. But ** also can be translated as *to forge*. The more often used word for this meaning is **, from ** that is a smith or a forger

** or ** is casus accusativus for **. That is a guy, young man. Synonym is **

Vorheart
Member
# Posted: 28 Nov 2004 14:28 - Edited by: Vorheart
Reply 


I just learned the numbers :)
A question though, does anyone know why 40 and 90 are irregular?

All other numbers follow the same naming rules but 40 is (sorok) instead of (chotirdesjat or chotirdesyat for english users :)) and 90 is ' (devjanosto) instead of ' (devjatdesjat or devyatdesyat).

If anyone knows an interesting story behind this, pray tell. I'll be more than happy to hear it!
It's always easier to learn the language when you have anecdotes to help your memory... :D


EDIT:
Thanks Heart_Healer!!! You're a great help! :)

Edit2:
I just finished counting up to 200... :D

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 4 Dec 2004 01:41
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I need to know, how do you say "MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR" in ukrainian. I need the text in cyrrillics and a transliteration, budlaska!

versu
Member
# Posted: 4 Dec 2004 03:04 - Edited by: versu
Reply 


Lussekatt


(Veselykh svjat i shchaslyvoho novoho roku)

Usually for Happy New Year people tend to just write

(Z novym rokom).

Jag tittar nu på ukrainsk tv och dom spelar Ruslana med bilder från Torget.

Heart_healer
Member
# Posted: 4 Dec 2004 09:19
Reply 


versu

that is right, but ** means just *holiday* Christmas is *г* (rizdvó)
so when we mean Christmas we can say * в * or * в* or just * в*

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 4 Dec 2004 21:43
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hmm it seemes to be diffrent answers to my question.....

*confused Lusse*

Heart_healer
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 00:09
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Lussekatt

don't be confused, actually it's easy ;)
u can choose such variant you like more. ukrainian language allows that :)

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 00:10
Reply 


allows, thats interesting. But also more difficult to learn then.

versu
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 13:55
Reply 


Lussekatt

Here are a couple of contemporary Xmas cards, with a slightly different variant of the Greeting. You can safely use this one:





And a couple of links in English about Xmas in Ukraine:

http://www.brama.com/art/christmas.html
http://www.uazone.net/holidays/christmas.html

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 19:39
Reply 


versu

hehe thanks! You are cool...I have alredy seen the lower one long time ago. But now I notice its actually MAIDAN!! Gosh, I love that square...!

and its difficult to read cyrillics in that kind of textstyle....but this is still helpful. After some analyzing I will have the text I need.

and thanks for those links. I have seen them to but its always nice to have an update ;)

versu
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 19:53
Reply 


Lussekatt

в

Literally (best wishes for ) THE NEW YEAR AND THE BIRTH OF CHRIST

в = Nativity = Christmas.

Don't forget that Christmas in Ukraine falls on January 7th, so after New Year which is why the greeting is the opposite way from the usual greeting in the West.

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 20:14
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oh man.....actually this confuse Lusse even more....I got the ´christmascards clear but what do you mean with:

best wishes for )

Is the words "best wishes for" written or not? and it differs from hearthealers:

* в * or * в* or just * в*

what is the translation of these words. Something with Christmas but how?

And I think its cool that the greeting is the "opposite". I will definetaly respect that and write it so!

Sorry....

versu
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 21:06
Reply 


Lussekatt
Is the words "best wishes for" written or not? and it differs from hearthealers:

No, that is why I put that in brackets. It is understood even if not written. What the card actually says I put in capital letters.

в is literally " Happy Christmas Holidays"

в is "Happy Christmas"

в is literally "With Christmas" but what is understood is "best wishes for Christmas"

There are many ways to wish somebody a happy Christmas, just like in English, for example:

Happy Christmas, Merry Christmas or Seasons Greetings etc.

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 5 Dec 2004 21:12
Reply 


hmm, pjoff.....

Lussekatt
Member
# Posted: 10 Dec 2004 18:33
Reply 


after some thinking again I will try this...

в

Heart_healer
Member
# Posted: 23 Dec 2004 16:19
Reply 


Lussekatt

here is greetings from Ruslana... hope u've received it as well as me :)



Murat
Member
# Posted: 23 Dec 2004 21:55
Reply 


I do not think The Ukranian alphabet is much more difficult as soon as it seems. Of course all the foreign language and the new alphabet get reaaly hard at the begining for the learners but if you do your best in application and learning you could be keen on Ukranian language. Just may be for Ruslana İt could be done:)

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